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Response on vaccination

Response on vaccination

Thank you for sharing your post. One of the best ways that parents can protect their children’s health is through vaccinations. Immunizations can save the life of a child. Because of medication advances, a child can be protected from more diseases than it was possible some decades back. Some of the diseases that at one time caused massive deaths in children have been totally eliminated, while others are close to becoming extinct because of the effective and safe utilization of vaccines. An example is poliomyelitis, which has been effectively controlled thanks to the widespread vaccination programs across the nation and worldwide. At one time, polio was among the most feared disease in the US because it caused paralysis and death; in fact, one of the founding fathers of the nation (Franklin Roosevelt) had polio. However, today, polio is prevented with immunization (Orenstein & Ahmed, 2017).

Vaccines are also very safe and effective because they are administered only after careful reviews by healthcare professionals, including doctors and pharmacists. Although vaccines involve some level of pain and discomfort, tenderness, or redness at the administration point, this is minimal in comparison to the trauma and the negative consequences that the disease may bring. Minor (2015) points out that vaccines have eliminated diseases that severely disabled or even killed people a few years ago. An example is the smallpox vaccine that totally eradicated the disease across the globe. Children no longer have to get the smallpox vaccine because the disease is non-existent. Also, when children are vaccinated against rubella. It decreases the risks of the pregnant woman passing the disease to the fetus, and the birth defects linked to the virus are non-existent in the US. When children are vaccinated completely, in the future, parents may begin to trust that the diseases we have today will be a thing of the past.

References

Minor, P. D. (2015). Live attenuated vaccines: Historical successes and current challenges. Virology479, 379-392.

Orenstein, W. A., & Ahmed, R. (2017). Simply put: Vaccination saves lives.

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Response on vaccination

Citations: At least one high-level scholarly reference in APA per post from within the last 5 years

Vaccines play a major role in the theater of public health. These vaccinations have reduced not only disease but disability and death from a wide range of dangerous diseases. Children are recommended in the United States to receive a series of sixteen vaccinations against 9 vaccine-preventable diseases which include smallpox and rubella. Vaccines don’t just protect the individual that receives them but also the community they live in. Person-to-person infection occurs when a transmitting person comes in contact with a person who is not adequately protected. If the individual that is infected only comes in contact with individuals that are immune, then the disease is not spread (Orenstein & Ahmed, 2017).
Regardless that vaccines are safe, there is a perception that vaccines are unsafe and unnecessary by a growing number of individuals. Vaccine programs face a lack of confidence in their effectiveness and are therefore threatened to extinction. Vaccine acceptance is a complex and personal decision and involves cultural, emotional, and spiritual factors that may affect an individual to obtain a vaccine. Individuals have been leery of vaccines since they were developed. Many barriers to vaccinations have been identified. These include the fear of side effects, reluctance of the care provider to recommend the vaccine, and the usefulness of the vaccines along with many others (Dube et al., 2013). The key to vaccinating is to explain to them the safety of the vaccine and the help it will provide them. No one should fear a vaccination. They have been proven safe for years.

Response on vaccination

Response on vaccination

References
Dube, E., Laberge, C., Bramadat, P., Guay, M., Roy, R., & Bettinger, J. A. (2013). Vaccine hesitancy. Human vaccines and immunotherapeutics, 9(8), 1763–1773. https://doi.org/10.4161/hv.24657
Orenstein, W. A., & Ahmed, R. (2017). Simply put: Vaccination saves lives. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 114(16), 4031–4033. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1704507114

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